Nutrition Is Individual

At Bon Nutrition everyone is treated as an individual. In your consultation we will assess your general health, family medical history, dietary habits and digestive function as well as any diagnosed medical issue you may be wanting to address.

All our assessments are non invasive and treated with the strictest of confidence. We will support you with dietary adjustments, menu plans, recipe ideas, lifestyle changes and if required nutritional supplementation.

"BON will work with you on a dietary and lifestyle plan to suit your individual needs while paying careful attention to any medication that you may have been prescribed."

Trevor Butler DipNT MBANT
Founder - BON Nutrition

The BON Way

BON Nutrition prides itself on a jargon free and individualised approach to your health and well being. We are here to guide and support you on your journey to good health and lifestyle balance. It is our belief that achieving this depends on your understanding of nutrition and the impact your lifestyle can have on your health.

We aim to demystify the science of nutrition and provide clear, jargon free information to help you maintain your focus on healthy living.

BON Nutrition Jargon Buster Title

Brocolli

Broccoli is one of the most nutritionally dense foods, rich in vitamins A, C and K and minerals such as potassium and magnesium.

It also contains compounds called glucosinolates, in particular indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane which research in the John Hopkins School of medicine in Baltimore has found to have strong cancer fighting effects.

Rice

Rice is the easiest grain to digest. As well as the fibre content helping the digestive system, rice may help clear psoriasis and is an anticancer food. Rice bran may also help to lower cholesterol and prevent kidney stones.

Whole brown rice is rich in B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and Iron. Wild rice is much richer in protein, and vitamins B1 and B2. White rice has had much of its goodness removed.

Pineapple

Pineapples contain a natural enzyme called bromelain that helps in the digestion of the fruit. Bromelain can be taken in supplement form as an anti-inflammatory agent. It is also known to help dissolve blood clots.

Eggs

Eggs are an ideal source of protein as they contain all of the essential amino acids. They also contain vitamins A, B2, D and E. The minerals copper, iron, sulphur and phosphorus.

They should however be eaten advisedly as they are not good for those with high blood cholesterol or with coronary artery disease.

Bananas

Bananas are a rich source of many nutrients especially potassium, an important electrolyte which may help regulating heart function, fluid balance and consequently blood pressure.

Bananas contain a soluble fibre called pectin that may help to lower cholesterol, normalise bowel function and sooth the gastrointestinal tract.

Nuts

There are over 300 types of nuts. Rich in many micronutrients and phytonutrients and one of the best sources of arginine, an amino acid that is used in wound healing, detoxification and by the immune system.

Arginine also promotes the excretion of a number of hormones including insulin and growth hormone.

Blueberries

With approximately 30 different species of blueberry these little fruits contain flavonoids that act as antioxidants protecting the body from cell damage.

They are also a good source of fibre, vitamin C for the immune system and vitamin E for healthy skin.

Garlic

Garlic is one of the most renowned superfoods. The list of benefits that may be gained from garlic are vast including fighting infections, lowering cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, protection from some cancers and those suffering from respiratory infections such as asthma.

Garlic supplements are available but wherever possible use fresh garlic ensuring that the cloves are not dried out before use.

Brocolli

Broccoli is one of the most nutritionally dense foods, rich in vitamins A, C and K and minerals such as potassium and magnesium.

It also contains compounds called glucosinolates, in particular indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane which research in the John Hopkins School of medicine in Baltimore has found to have strong cancer fighting effects.

The liver is both the largest internal organ of the body and the main chemical processing centre. It is the detoxification centre managing the collation and elimination of the bodies waste, it is involved in the balancing of blood sugar, it is involved in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. It is involved on over 500 different chemical processes keeping the body in a stable, balanced state.
Many of the adverts you see on your TV these days will talk about food being rich in omega 3 and omega 6. These are essential fatty acids that the body has to get through its food consumption as the body is unable to synthesis them in sufficient quantity for itself. Omega 3, found in oily fish, walnuts and flaxseed, helps to keep the skin looking younger by preventing dryness and scaliness.
Excess consumption of some vitamins and minerals such as vitamins A, B3, D and Zinc can be toxic to the body however deficiencies may contribute to many body ailments. Nutrients need to be balanced to achieve optimum health.
Vitamins are organic substances essential for life. Most vitamins cannot be synthesized by the body and as such vitamin rich food is essential to health. Minerals are inorganic substances, important components of tissues and fluids. They are necessary for the proper functioning of vitamins, enzymes, hormones, and other metabolic activities in the body. Minerals compose 4 percent of the body's weight.
Blood sugar balance within the body is essential for managing glucose and insulin levels. Poor blood sugar balance can result in irregular production of insulin and an be a precursor to diabetes.
Health promoting substances found in plant foods. They have recently been associated with disease prevention and may help lower cholesterol.
Chemicals found naturally in the body as well as in some foods that combat free radicals that cause body cell damage. Foods sources include carrots, spinach, broccoli and many fruits
Reactive molecules caused by external factors such as pollution, smoke, certain foods and internal chemical reactions that bind to and destroys body cells